Accidentally Awesome

Great photographers spend a fair amount of time perfecting techniques that capture the individual personality of their subjects.  One of my favorite ways to photograph children, especially toddlers and pre-teens, is to catch them in candid moments when they don’t know I’m taking their picture.

Toddlers are notoriously wiggly or performing for the camera – and pre-teens… well, they’re different, although much the same!  Next time you’re taking pictures of your children at the zoo or at a birthday party, try focusing on them when they’re not looking, avoiding posing them or telling them to smile… and you may be very pleased with the results!

studying

I recently caught my pre-teen in a rare quiet moment of contemplation. Immediately after this photo was taken, his hands were up in front of his face, blocking himself from the camera’s view, and I ended up with about 5 blurry photos of his hands. The reward of course, was the first photo I took – one of my favorite photos of him.

Another technique I use for moving subjects, including wildlife (and toddlers… and pre-teens) is to utilize my camera’s burst function, which takes several photos in quick succession.  Over-using this can result in a LOT of photos to sort through, but it can also be a good way to capture small details you may not have noticed as you were just trying to get the shot.

This fawn was playing with his twin sister and mother in the snow near my office.  I was disappointed that I hadn't captured a photo of him running - but when I downloaded the photos from my camera, this one surprised me - I hadn't even noticed the snow clinging to his whiskers and nose!

This fawn was playing with his twin sister and mother in the snow near my office. I was disappointed that I hadn’t captured a photo of him running – but when I downloaded the photos from my camera, this one surprised me – I hadn’t even noticed the snow clinging to his whiskers and nose!

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